Just What We Kneaded

Well you had to know the next international pick was going to be a good one. Miss A is up to bat after all. Some of you may remember that last time she took us to the country of Uzbekistan which turned out to be quite delicious. So where did she take us this time? Greenland! And I have to say, she’s quite excited about it.

Now after my initial research, it became clear that this was going to be challenging. If you’ve ever searched for recipes from Greenland, they’re really few and far between. Especially when you don’t have access to Caribou (the meat – not the coffee). We did learn that Greenlandic cuisine is traditionally based on a variety of proteins including game, birds, fish and marine animals. It is also heavily influenced by Danish and Canadian cuisines. For tonight, however, we let Miss A pick our first recipe which we found on the Rachel Cotterill blog, called Kalaallit Kaagiat (or Greenlandic Cake).

Now I was just hopeful it wouldn’t disappoint her like the last “cake” did, but with ingredients like sugar, raisins and butter we were off to a better start.

We mixed these ingredients in a bowl with a cup of boiling water and stirred to melt the butter.

Next we dissolved a packet of quick rise yeast in a 1/4 cup of lukewarm water.

We then added the yeast to the mixing bowl along with about 3-1/2 cups of flour which we mixed together to form a slightly sticky dough.

We sat the dough aside for an hour before “lightly” dusting our counter with flour.

Once the dough finished rising,

Miss A then began the process of folding and kneading,

which she handled rather expertly. I literally didn’t knead this one bit.

When the dough was soft and smooth, we formed it into a round and placed it on a parchment lined baking sheet to rise for another 30 minutes.

Then before baking, we brushed the top of the dough with milk.

The dough baked for 25 minutes at 400F and came out a beautiful golden brown (at which point I about fell over – this was gorgeous!).

Now for those of you that don’t know, I attempted bread making last summer. I had a few successes, but mostly many, many misses. Bread making (like frosting cakes and cupcakes) requires a great deal of patience which I often reserve for other things. So when I saw this loaf come out of the oven I seriously almost started jumping up and down. It worked!

Maybe it was Miss A’s expert kneading, Courtney’s Amish Country Bread which inspired me to get back into the game a few weeks ago, or just a simple bit of luck, but this bread looked darn good if I do say so myself. Once it cooled we dusted it with a bit of confectioner’s sugar mixed with some cardamom and then sliced some “cake” style.

And not only did this bread look good – it tasted good too! It’s definitely a sweet bread; in fact, very similar to the Hawaiian rolls we used in our last French toast. It can easily be served as a snack, at breakfast or as a side dish.

The crust is perfectly colored and textured and the bread is soft, moist and just down-right delicious. Let’s just say there’s very little of this bread left.

As for our spoon ratings, Mike, Miss A and I came in with the highest possible vote of 4 spoons. Mr. N says he’s only going to give it 3 spoons because it’s not his favorite bread, but it’s really good. (He has since asked for this bread daily and is never satisfied with one serving…hmmm. ;) )

So if you find that bread is challenging, I’d recommend giving this one a shot. And if you have a three-year old on hand to manage all the kneading – even better! Have a great weekend everyone and we’ll be back Monday with our first Greenlandic main course dish. Cheers!

Print this recipe: Kalaallit Kaagiat

202 thoughts on “Just What We Kneaded

  1. rachelcotterill says:

    I just saw this page pop up on my stats – love that you’re cooking your way around the world like this, which is something I definitely enjoy doing myself :)

    Like

    • Kristy says:

      Thank you so much for stopping by Rachel! We LOVED this recipe. We’ve already made it twice and I know will be making it again. It wasn’t easy to find recipes from Greenland, so we were happy to find yours! :)

      Like

  2. macuisineetvous.wordpress.com says:

    Une belle histoire bien photographiée qui nous donne envie de cuisiner cette belle recette.
    A great storywith nice picture that makes us want to cook this wonderful recipe.
    a french cooker Chantal
    Please visit my blog of recipe: http://www.macuisineetvous.com

    Like

  3. Life's a Bowl says:

    This is a great story and a tasty looking recipe! One of my best childhood friends and I always used to bake bread the morning after we had a sleepover- the only problem was, we never had yeast… To say our bread was bad is being kind, our breads were gross :P Maybe I’ll have to get back into the bread baking mode just for this recipe!

    Like

  4. Mel says:

    Dear Miss A! Stop being so cute!
    :-)

    That bread looks crazy good. I need to close your site after I read this comment, or I’ll get unbearably hungry and that is not a good thing past 1 in the morning :-o

    Have a great day, you all!!

    Like

  5. trialsinfood says:

    the bread does look good and it looks like you have a budding baker on your hands! i have to admit i also have no patience with frosting cakes, but this recipe doesn’t look too difficult so maybe i will give it a try.

    Like

  6. myownprivatemind says:

    Beautiful pictures, and your daughter is just too sweet! I have never made a thing from Greenland, so I think I might try this. Glad to see you were Freshly Pressed! Best of cooking!!!! – Amanda

    Like

  7. sangjiwa says:

    between this cake, pie and sausage… i imagine 1 obvious similarity… huhu.. your movie teller instill such image-ination.. huhu couldnt help to erase it.. still.. a hunger will eat anything so long as it is yum yum looking.. :).

    Like

  8. John T. Osorio says:

    I can’t wait until my son is old enough (only 5 months at the moment) to play with me in the kitchen! Popped this one in the file for a rainy day as it looks delicious! Congratulations for the FP.

    Like

  9. gkorula says:

    Looks so yummy, I gotta make this right away. Can you tell me how much yeast you added in gms or tbsps. I don’t get packets of active yeast as you have shown. thanks

    Like

  10. larrie269 says:

    I love the unique approach you have to a cooking blog, with Miss A helping and choosing where the cuisine is from! My husband and I recently started a cooking blog for him (like just the other DAY recently) and I suddenly wish we had a cute kid already so they could help us out and be the adorable model for us. Keep it up!
    Do you think this would be too sweet to try out as a french toast?

    Like

    • Kristy says:

      Now there’s an idea. This year we’re also blogging our quest for the best French toast (last year was banana bread). We’ll give it a try and let you know! :)

      Like

      • larrie269 says:

        What a fun quest! I loved it with challah bread, but that’s more ordinary than banana bread. Sounds like a delicious breakfast for Saturday morning. Thanks!

        Like

  11. Marilyn says:

    Over 130 comments!!!!! Kristy, you are amazing. I can attest to just how good this bread was. I know where they live and did pop over for hugs and a slice. Not sure which was better, the hugs or the bread.

    Like

  12. socialshan says:

    I’ve never seen your blog before, but it’s wonderful. Such a creative idea to learn about other cultures with children. It’s true that food is the heart of every culture! Great post.

    Like

  13. starlaschat says:

    Four Spoons! That’s so cute the photos just adoriable so cute Miss A :+) The bread after hearing four spoons I must give this one a try .Lots of Beautiful photos! It looks pretty I like that it is cake style Yummmm

    Like

  14. KylaB says:

    You make me want to try bread baking. It’s not easy. I know. I’ve failed before. But this looks achievable.
    Thanks also for the step by step pictures. I wish more food blogs did this.

    Like

  15. midnitechef says:

    It’s wonderful to have your daughter making bread with you! I’ll have to wait a few months before my 2 yr old can knead, but she loves to help pour in the ingredients. Love the idea of spoon ratings :P Bravo for being freshly pressed!

    Like

  16. mumchic says:

    Fabulous photography and the bread looks delicious , I am very impressed with Ms.A’s kneading capabilities , she is adorable :)

    Looking forward to more Greenlandic fare , quite an unexplored cuisine.

    Cheers !

    Like

  17. Sara says:

    This looks so fun, I love the pictures of your daughter kneading and the shining smile on her face. I’m intrigued by this travelling the world via the kitchen project and am curious to know more. Is this a blog challenge you are participating in? (Also, congrats on being a featured post). I love getting my kids in the kitchen too so I will definitely be bookmarking your site.

    Like

    • Kristy says:

      Thank you for stopping by and nope, it’s not part of a blog challenge. This was just an idea that the four of us cooked up nearly a year ago. The kids thought it would be fun to try foods from around the world, and my husband and I thought it would be a great way to open their minds to other cultures around the world. :)

      Like

  18. AJ says:

    Great post! Bread-making has always been one of my favorite activities to do when babysitting, because not only can kids participate in almost all of it, but it also breaks the time up into chunks that are pretty similar in length to a child’s attention span. Plus, when you’re done you can go on a picnic! I find that it does the same thing for us impatient adults, as well – if I plan to pay bills and balance the checkbook during the first rise, write a blog post during the second, and do some housecleaning while it’s in the oven (note that that is the shortest of the three time increments), I get my tasks done and bread baked and don’t feel like I’ve been slaving away all afternoon.

    Like

  19. Elaine says:

    Wow, it looks good indeed! And the dough looks like its already not sticky by the time you start kneading, which makes kneading much easier. Extremely tempted to try it definitely.

    Like

  20. Meredith says:

    I love to see kids cooking! Our 2 year old is starting to get the hang of measuring for me and is loving every little taste she “sneaks” along the way!

    Like

  21. Curly Bug says:

    Wow that golden color is just beautiful. I must say my 4 yr old has deeply contributed to sucessful loaves with his constant need to stir/sift the dry ingredients when making banana bread or the like. I love how your little girl had the magic touch and this idea of making dishes from different countries is so fantastic. Great post!

    Like

  22. happykidshappymom says:

    Looks like your little girl did a fantastic job! I bet my own three-year-old would love to make this bread as well. Just one question — when you set it aside to rise, did you do that at room temperature? I’ve heard of draping a damp dishcloth over the bread, and sitting it in a 200 degree oven. Thanks — and I look forward to trying this recipe. :)

    Like

    • Kristy says:

      We set it aside to rise on the stove top. The oven was preheating, so it made the stove top a bit warmer than room temperature. And yep, we did cover it with a damp towel. :)

      Like

  23. NanaBread says:

    How ironic and wonderful! I just printed your recipe off of the Tasty Kitchen page of The Pioneer Woman’s website, and then opened WordPress to see it there. Congrats on the Freshly Pressed feature. It was a very pleasant surprise to see it there. The recipe looks fabulous, by the way, and your daughter made a lovely little baker. I’m looking forward to trying this one myself.

    Like

  24. Jennifer M. says:

    You are very brave to try unknown, foreign cuisines – especially with little ones in the house. Your helper is getting quite a valuable education – lucky her :)

    Can’t wait to read more. Literally a feast for the eyes…

    Like

  25. I Made You A Mixtape says:

    Oh, I love the idea of trying recipes from around the world! You can learn so much about different cultures through their food. If you want to try something delicious, I can recommend Finnish Karelian pies. They are basically rice in a thin, thin crust. Served warm with butter or egg salad on top…. :o)

    Like

  26. Changes In Longitude says:

    My Sicilian grandfather was a bread baker who taught me how to knead dough.This brings back great memories. Glad to see a new generation taking it up.

    We’re traveling around the world for a year but not likely to make it to Greenland so thanks for sharing your story.

    Cheers!

    Larissa & Michael

    Like

  27. The International Dinner Project says:

    OMG! We started doing this as well, back in November, posting on Facebook – but our friends told us is was such a good idea to take it to a proper blog. So please I hope you don’t feel like we’re stepping on your (blogging) toes. Our son chose Greenland last Monday and we just had out Greenland dinner on Saturday (Friday in the US). Great minds!
    Such wonderful photos!

    Like

  28. thepossibleself says:

    She has such a fabulous smile………..she will always be a baker. i raised three girls and made bread with them as you do with your wee lass….and as they are now over thirty they still bake and introduce me to new recipes….so well done you for carrying on a human tradition in baking………….enjoyyyyyyyyyyyy

    Like

  29. emmycooks says:

    I love baking bread with my kids. I posted recently about making challah with my three year old, who is also an enthusiastic kneader! Anything with ‘cake’ in the name is likely to be popular in our family as well. It looks like you picked a good recipe that we should try soon!

    Like

  30. ceciliag says:

    wow, i could make this bread too, it looks great and Miss A is a star, i used to put my chairs around that way when the kids were standing on them to cook so no-one leant back and fell off.. everyone thought i was batty so i am glad to see you doing the same thing.. lovely post.. c

    Like

  31. Lisa Nocera (@LisaNutrition) says:

    You inspire me to get back in the kitchen to bake some bread! I tend to over work the dough when I knead the bread and the result is a tough chewy bread. Miss A is a natural in the kitchen, so adorable! I look forward to your Greenland adventures!

    Like

  32. Charles says:

    Hi Kristy – I’m so eager to see this visit to Greenland! My friend’s mother is Greenlandic – he doesn’t talk much about the cuisine there… he’s not much of a food person, but from the snippets I’ve gathered, he’s not really into it much because he detests fish, and they seem to use a lot of it, but I guess we’ll see. This offering looks nothing at all like what I would have expected – it looks a lot like something we have in England called tea-cake. It looks wonderful – I think I’d love it, and I just can’t wait to see what the next dish is going to be… I’m so curious! :D

    Like

    • Kristy says:

      I have no doubt that you would love this Charles and that you could pull it off with ease. :) I’ll have to look into the English tea cake now too. And you guessed it…lots of fish!

      Like

  33. profiterolesandponytails says:

    I just happen to have a three year old on hand to knead. This looks like a good one to get my girls started baking bread, which I haven’t done with them yet. I can’t wait to see what else you make from Greenland and if there are any Canadian influences.

    Like

    • Kristy says:

      It’s amazing…but I think her little hands and light touch were just perfect with this bread. :) We have our next two recipes lined up. I’m not sure if there’s a Canadian influence or not. You’ll have to let me know. :)

      Like

  34. Julia {The Roasted Root} says:

    Clever post title and what a gorgeous little girl! She has a beautiful smile and already a great baker! Your bread recipe looks awesome with the golden raisins. Looks like it turned out perfectly – I’d slather raspberry jam and butter all over it! Have a fun weekend.

    Like

  35. Caroline says:

    That bread looks incredible, Kristy!!! It does look a bit cakey, but no complaints here. Miss A did such a great job kneading the dough. She really is becoming quite the chef. I need to jump on the bread bandwagon with you and Courtney…I’ve yet to give it a try!

    Like

  36. Geni - Sweet and Crumby says:

    I would definitely give it a four spoon from the looks of it. It’s beautiful Kristy! Go Miss A.! What an accomplished kneader she is. Glad you are back in the “bread” game and this certainly looks like a great way to round the bases.

    Like

  37. Eva kitcheninspirations.wordpress.com says:

    Wow, Kristy, not only beautiful but tasty too! I am so happy this worked out for you. I know how disheartening it can be. We’re trying to hold back carbs for a short time (so I can get into my New York jeans) otherwise I would make it right away. I’ll bookmark it for a later time. Have a wonderful weekend. We’re expecting 20°C for the next few days. In fact, we may be heading out to a patio shortly (yup, it’s 3:37pm, I LOVE my boss!!!!)

    Like

    • Kristy says:

      Fantastic boss you have Eva! I hope you got to enjoy your patio. That’s our plan for today as well. We’re getting the outside furniture set back up and grilling out tonight. I’m loving this unseasonably warm weather. :)

      Like

  38. Kelly says:

    I was so captivated by Miss A and her adorable pink dress with matching barrette that I almost (almost) overlooked your beautiful cake bread. What a success Kristy! A great rise and gorgeous golden colour. Miss A’s magic touch may well be just what your loaves have kneaded all along! ;-).

    Like

    • Kristy says:

      She did look adorable didn’t she? She usually looks made up for about 5 or 10 minutes a day. LOL! And I think you’re right – my breads have just kneaded her. ;)

      Like

  39. Purely.. Kay says:

    It actually looks like a cross between a pound cake and a bread to me. I have no idea why but it does lol. Miss A did a wonderful job kneading that bread. Of course she is looking more and more like you Kristy :).. gorgeous. I would actually eat this and you know how I feel about brad

    Like

  40. spicegirlfla says:

    I am so going to make this one!! Almost reminds me of Pannetone bread. Good job on the kneading Miss !, I’m really impressed she handled it all! It’s right before lunch and this has really gotten me hungry!!

    Like

    • Kristy says:

      I don’t know that I’ve ever had a Pannetone bread before, but the taste of this was familiar to me. It is a good one and I hope you enjoy it. :) I was impressed with Miss A too. I fully expected to have to finish it off for her, but when she was done, it looked just right. :)

      Like

  41. ChgoJohn says:

    Now this is one good-looking loaf of bread! I, too, have had my fair share of missteps with bread but, when it “works,” there’s noting quite like it. Miss A got quite the lesson, and reward, this time around. I hope you all have a great weekend, too, Kristy!

    Like

    • Kristy says:

      You’re right – when a bread works out, there is nothing quite like it. The sense of accomplishment is worth it all. Hope you’re enjoying your weekend too! :)

      Like

  42. Courtney says:

    Yay!!! Nice work, Kristy and Miss A! I’m just telling you that making bread is addicting… And now I have a new bread to try myself. (Thank you kindly for the shout out, too.) Have a wondeful weekend!

    Like

  43. fati's recipes says:

    I’ll say! That gorgeous little baker’s putting us all to shame! This bread looks delicious… reminds me of a Syrian sweet treat.. very similar to this, but without the raisins… and it’s covered with sugar on top! :)

    Like

  44. sallybr says:

    Greg, I think you are right, Miss A is trying to put us all home cooks into shame… While making bread, I won t allow my husband to hold a camera, for fear of black mailing…

    Miss A looks like a super star!

    Like

    • Kristy says:

      LOL! She was very excited to wear her new dress to school this particular day. The weather has been fantastic, so she actually wore short sleeves and no coat! She was in heaven. Miss A is definitely our summer child. If she doesn’t end up living in a warmer climate someday I’ll be shocked. ;)

      Like

    • Kristy says:

      LOL! This just happened to be right before she went to school. She comes home looking much more like herself – barrette out, hair all over the place, stains on the clothes and usually paint on her face. ;)

      Like

  45. Three Well Beings says:

    How are you doing with all the pronunciations! Greenland would indeed be a big challenge, but you’re off to a great start! This looks great! I just love the smile on Miss A’s face! She looks so delighted! What wonderful lessons she is learning and I must say I’m impressed. I need to go back and read more of the beginning blog posts and just see how you started. I love the teaching that is going on in your home…and I’m learning, too! :-) Debra

    Like

    • Kristy says:

      LOL – not a clue how to pronounce this one! The kids are definitely learning a lot and the best part is that they really have no idea! They’re just having fun. :)

      Like

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