Don’t Try This at Home

It’s our last night of Welsh cuisine, for this little stint at least, and you know what that means. It’s dessert time! We came across the recipe for an apple pastry in our Welsh cookbook. The description reads, “Although traditionally cooked on a griddle…this apple pie can be baked in the oven.” But that’s like a dare isn’t it?! At least it was to us, we weren’t about to bake this in the oven. We all know apple pies are fabulous in the oven, and we’re no strangers to them around here, but an apple pie on a griddle?? That’s a new one.

We began our Apple Skillet Pie by whipping up our all butter, double pie crustΒ (the same one we used for our blueberry pie this summer). Then we mixed up our standard apple pie filling. This time we used a combo of Granny Smith apples and McIntosh apples.

We then tossed in some white sugar, dark brown sugar, lemon juice, butter, cinnamon, nutmeg and a tiny pinch of ground cloves.

The recipe called for stewed apples, so we tossed our mixture into a sauce pan and cooked it covered for about 5 to 7 minutes, until they were good and tender.

We then drained the apples, so that there was no liquid left in the mixture. It’s important to note here that you don’t get rid of that liquid. It’s too good to toss. Soooo good. Set it aside, you’ll thank us later.

With our stewed apples ready to go, we turned our attention back to our pie crust and rolled out a top and bottom crust.

We then spooned the apple mixture into the center of the bottom pie crust and sprinkled it with a bit of flour to absorb any extra liquid run-off.

Next we rubbed a bit of milk around the circumference of the bottom pie crust and then placed the top crust over the apples. We used our fingers to seal the pie firmly around the same area we used the milk so that it creates a tighter seal.

Next we used a pie cutter to cut away the excess dough and make a nice pretty edge. (And stopped by the reserved apple liquid bowl for a sample – well, at least Miss A and I did.)

It was then time for the “fun” to begin. We got out our griddle pan, tossed some butter on it and began to heat it over a medium-low heat. We also rubbed the top pie crust with some butter as well. When the griddle was ready, we carefully moved the pie onto the surface and began our experiment.

Things were going along rather smoothly. The pie crust was browning nicely and the smell of apple pie was in the air (That could have been from the appleΒ hand pies we had in the oven though.). Then it came time to flip the pie, and this is where things took a turn for the worse. It’s not easy to flip a 9-inch pie filled with apples; but we did it, and once it was golden brown on both sides we removed it from the griddle. As you can see, it didn’t quite go as planned.

At this point I wasn’t sure this thing was going to make the blog, but I went ahead with the pictures anyway. We scooped out some vanilla ice cream and then used the reserved apple liquid run-off to drizzle over the top of the pie and ice cream. You can thank us know. πŸ˜‰

I decided to make Mike the guinea pig on this one and gave him the first sample bite. I was too nervous to try it. I love apple pie. I make a mean apple pie and I was afraid of what this was going to do to my apple-pie-making-mo-jo. Much to my surprise though, he said it wasn’t too bad.

The kids quickly came running over at the sound of samples. The three of us then each took a bite. And do you know what happened next? We all quickly grabbed our own spoon, sat down right on the kitchen floor, and dug in forgetting that we were about to sit down to dinner. And nevermind the apple hand pies we had whipped up for a block party. Those could wait. The sample piece of Welsh apple skillet pie was gone within seconds. We were even scrambling with our spoons to get the next bite before it was gone. It was then we realized, that despite it’s ugly and not-so-perfect appearance we were going to have to blog this one. I mean a meal that makes us stop what we’re doing, actually sit down on the floor and eat?

Maybe it was that we hadn’t had an apple pie in a while or maybe it was that we were just hungry. Whatever the case, we all gave it 3 spoons. Even Mr. N who normally isn’t a big fan of apple pie dug right in. He even ate it all again after our lamb dinner the next night and has requested another piece since then. We probably won’t make an apple skillet pie again, and if you attempt to give it a try – my suggestion would be to make smaller pies. That said, this is one cooking experience that we’ll never forget.

Print this recipe: Apple Skillet Pie

50 thoughts on “Don’t Try This at Home

  1. Dorene Baumgarten says:

    Thank you for your post, I was sad that my family was not able to make it to the apple orchard this year. Instead I ended up buying one of the bags and using that to do some baking. This years apple treat was apple /oatmeal cookies..I think they would have done better if I put in some walnuts though. Either way they were a good treat to add to the pile of recipies:)

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  2. Pamelia Heiberg says:

    There is nothing that says Fall like a nice warm apple pie. I have found a great way to make this all time favorite even better. Personal peices of pie:) All you do is make your pie as normal but instead of it getting put inot a pan to bake you simply put the shell and stuffing into a cupcake pan. Only 6 are allowed at a time for spill over. This way there is no cutting and everyone gets just the right size/hand held peice of apple pie:)

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    • Kristy says:

      That is a fabulous idea! I love it! I’m going to try this for the holidays. πŸ™‚ I made some apple hand pies last weekend, but this method sounds much easier! Thanks. πŸ™‚

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  3. Stefanie says:

    Appearance doesn’t matter as long as it tastes good!!! Great idea to save the juices! Extra spiced apple goodness sounds like a great ice cream topping, along with apple pie a la mode πŸ™‚

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  4. Casey says:

    Aw yum!!! I wish my parents would let me have apple pie for dinner! πŸ˜‰ You are muchh braver than me..taking the whole apple pie thing to the stove. I might consider it now, seeing that you guys loved it so much..sounds so yummy!

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    • Kristy says:

      Just make sure you make individual size pies. πŸ˜‰ And dessert before dinner every once in a while is always a good thing. I bet your parents would eat one of your desserts before dinner. πŸ˜‰

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  5. Caroline says:

    Bummer it didn’t turn out as expected, but I’m sure it was still delicious. I think that’s pretty normal to have difficulty flipping a 9-inch pie. I guarantee mine would look much, much worse! I love the image of you four sitting down on the floor eating the pie. I’m sure I would have done the exact same thing. πŸ™‚

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  6. Charles says:

    Oh no – disaster! Don’t you just *hate* that? Everything is going along so well and then pow, the cake breaks in half, or the oven breaks! Still – it looks delicious and I’m sure the taste wasn’t affected in the slightest! I’m loving your photos these days… my photos are getting worse as the days draw in. By the time I’m home from work and have finished cooking, it’s pitch black outside – grrrr. Will need to have a good cook-off of things this weekend! How are you lighting your shots these days? Only natural light?

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    • Kristy says:

      …or you take the turkey out of the oven and grease spills out a bit and fries the electrical circuit killing the whole stove. Yep, had that happen on Thanksgiving once. LOL. Fortunately this wasn’t quite as much of a disaster as that was…and it did still taste great. πŸ˜‰

      Thanks for the feedback on the photos. I just keep plugging away at it. I know what you mean though – these darn days just keep ending earlier and earlier. And we have daylight savings time coming up too. Sigh. I’ve been going all natural light. I’m trying to either cook mid-afternoon on the weekends or on Fridays during the day to get as much light as I can. I also bought a white board to bounce light and have been shooting in all manual mode with a tripod. The biggest help though as been in the post-processing. I’ve never been a big fan of post-processing. It always felt like cheating to me in a way. But after talking to a photographer, they said that usually about 50% of the work is done in post-processing programs. So I figured I’d give it a go. I’ve been using Adobe’s Lightroom and it totally helps. I’m still learning the ropes, but I’ve found the white balancing and playing with the exposure helps a ton. πŸ˜‰ Do you use any post-processing programs?

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      • Charles says:

        Yeah, I use Lightroom myself. I find it far too clumsy to be of any use as an actual photo organisation system (maybe just because I never took the time to learn that part?) – I do editing in that though and I find it wonderful!

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  7. Eva Taylor says:

    What a romantic pie story, Kristy! During the big blackout on the Eastern Seaboard, we got together with neighbours and cooked and entire gourmet dinner on our 3 grills! Our’s baked a cake, believe it or not. Even though I’ve been to four-star restaurants, it was one of the best meals ever! It’s the romance of it all!

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    • Kristy says:

      Now that sounds like a romantic and fun afternoon! I’m going to have to remember that if our power ever goes out again. πŸ˜‰ And you’re right…the romance of it all is what makes the memory last. πŸ™‚

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  8. Courtney says:

    I could so just take a bite of those stewed apples! And I admire you SO much for trying out the skillet version. You are very brave- and it looks like it didn’t turn out bad at all. (Also thank you so much for sharing a not-so-perfect recipe. They always make me feel less of a mess in the kitchen.)

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    • Kristy says:

      Oh the stewed apples! They were so good. It was all I could do to not dig in with a spoon. And believe me – we have plenty of not-so-perfect meals around here. My kitchen (and usually my clothes, hair, face) are always a mess! πŸ˜‰

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  9. Kay aka Babygirl says:

    Maybe Mr. N liked the skillet taste of the crust. And I like your mo-jo techniques lol. You really did a wonderful job with this pie. Hell, I was reading it thinking “If she didn’t eat that, I would take that off her hands” lol. Messed up or not it looked great to me lol. And having dessert first is fun isn’t it? I love it when I get to do that.

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    • Kristy says:

      I think you’re right – he did seem to really enjoy the skillet taste in the crust. I thought of you and your family making pies in the cast iron skillet with this one. πŸ™‚

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  10. spicegirlfla says:

    I could so see how this would taste really good!! And…I could just imagine the flipping ordeal!! I would be thinking that it should be made in a cast iron skillet then flipped to a plate to be returned to the skillet. Something like a frittata – tho I don’t always flip my frittata, when I do, that is the method I use. BTW, I made a pie crust the other day in the food processor and thought of you doing it by hand… I’m feeling like I need to ditch the processor and use my God-given tools!!

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    • Kristy says:

      A cast iron skillet would definitely make this easier! I’m going to remember that because I have always wanted to make a pie in one. And I say go for it…ditch the food processor next time you make a homemade pie crust. It’s so totally therapeutic and you’ll have such a sense of accomplishment when it’s all said and done. πŸ˜‰

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    • Kristy says:

      Really I knew there was going to be no way to flip it without a disaster. The filling was too heavy for the crust and the crust just gets so moist from the filling. Next time…smaller pies. Still it was fun and delicious. πŸ™‚

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  11. kitchenbelleicious says:

    Well now- if you tell me not to try something you know I will:) Actually this looks like a fun and amazing new pie twist. Loaded with yummy warm gooey sugary goodness- what is not to love- regardless of the method or approach! Great recipe- you always have the most fun ones

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  12. ChgoJohn says:

    Kristy, I give you credit for trying this recipe. I would have prepared the apples as the recipe directed but put them in a normal pie and baked it. I am far too clumsy to attempt to flip the Welsh version on the griddle. I can’t juggle either. 😦

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  13. Kelly says:

    I think it’s awesome that you rose to the griddle challenge (what a cool method) and… haven’t we heard all our lives that ‘you can’t judge a book…” – I’m very glad you posted this gorgeous apple pie. But, like Lisa, my only regret is not seeing a snap of all 4 of you on the floor mopping up your plates with Miss A letting everyone know what’s what πŸ™‚

    p.s. always enjoy your clever post titles.

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    • Kristy says:

      Thanks Kelly! This title actually came to me in the middle of the night. Then I couldn’t remember it for the longest time in the morning. I need to keep a pen and notebook next to the bed for all the random thoughts I wake up with. LOL. I would have loved a picture of that moment too. We were all too busy chowing down on the pie though. Hopefully the mental picture will last. πŸ™‚

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  14. smartfoodandfit says:

    Too bad you didn’t capture the moment of all of you guys sitting on the floor eating the pie! That’s priceless. The pie looks so delicious, I’m glad you posted the picures, broken pie crust and all, it’s still a wonderful tastey dessert!

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    • Kristy says:

      I wish I had a picture of that moment too. It was one of those where you kind of step back mentally and take it all in. The kids looked so cute. One of those warm your heart kind of moments. πŸ™‚

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  15. thecompletecookbook says:

    Kudos to you for giving it a try! Think I would have been tempted too and being the lover of everything individual would definitely make smaller pies – safer for turning. πŸ˜‰
    Have a super day.
    πŸ™‚ Mandy

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